2018 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

SUBMISSION GUIDE

 

 

 

 

presenters@redhat.com

To navigate, use your < and > arrow keys or the triangles at the bottoms of the page. 

3

4

5

6-9

10

11-13

14

15-16

17

18-26

important dates

 

Mark your calendar

September 19, 2017: Call for proposals opens

December 1, 2017: Last day to submit a proposal

February, 2018: Proposal decisions sent

March, 2018: Agenda published on redhat.com/summit

May 8-10, 2018: Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, CA

 

ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. VISIT REDHAT.COM/SUMMIT FOR UPDATES.

PRESENTER responsibilities

 

Know what you're getting into

By submitting a proposal, you agree to (if accepted):

  • Be available to give the proposed talk during the week of May 8-10, 2018.* 
  • Timely communication with event staff about your session.
  • Upload a PDF copy of your presentation before the conference begins, so that we may make the slides available to attendees immediately after the event.
  • Sign and return any required release forms prior to the event.

 

*This includes authorization for travel and expenses. Red Hat Summit does not provide travel or hotel for any breakout or lab speakers. Please speak with your manager to be sure you are approved for travel, if applicable.

 

Know the benefits

  • Session lead presenters receive one complimentary full conference pass to Red Hat Summit. See more info on participant types.
  • All other presenters, including panelists, receive a significant discount toward registration.

Selection process

 

This is How the agenda comes together

  • In the 2 weeks after the call for proposals closes, subject-matter experts from throughout Red Hat review and grade each submitted abstract. 
    • This process includes members of customer, partner, sales, product engineering, marketing, and regional teams.
    • Graders will be considering the originality of the abstract, the experience or expertise of the proposed speaker, and the relevance to event attendees and current technology trends.
  • Once grading is completed, the selection committee members review the highest-rated sessions and discuss their viability for a place on the agenda. 
    • Everyone is friendly, and no one argues. 
    • There will be a brief period when speakers may be asked to make adjustments to their abstracts in order to be accepted; a committee member closest to the subject will contact them.
  • Final decisions will be made, and notifications will be emailed to all submitters.

 

Session types

 

breakout session

Participants: 1 lead presenter + up to 2 co-presenters

A 45-minute stage presentation with slides, videos, and/or demonstrations. Limit to a specific topic, which can range from high-level customer or partner stories to detailed business or technical. Plan to leave 10 minutes at end for audience questions. The session lead should be an expert on the topic, with up to 2 co-presenters to support or add unique experiences or insights.

 

MINI SESSION

Participants: 1 lead presenter (no co-presenters)

A high-energy, 20-minute talk about a specific, condensed subject matter. Think of this as an abridged breakout session or an extended lightning talk. Slides should be limited, and no special session set-up will be allowed, as time between mini sessions is much shorter than between other session types.

 

 

Session types  

 

Birds of a feather

Participants: 1 lead presenter+ up to 1 co-presenter

An informal, 45-minute conversation with audience members that doesn't typically have an outline or prescribed direction. Audience members will ultimately decide the direction of this session. Up to 2 moderators will introduce themselves and offer a few talking points on the topic, then act as guides to ensure the conversation stays on topic. No audio/visual equipment is provided, so no slides will be used.

 

PANEL

Participants: 1 lead presenter (moderator) + up to 5 co-presenters (panelists)

A moderated 45-minute discussion between panelists with shared experience or expertise. The moderator, generally a Red Hat expert or industry analyst, has communicated the topic with the panelists beforehand, and all should have a general idea of the conversation’s direction. Panelists are customers, partners, project participants, or similar, each with a unique voice on the topic. Slides, though not required, should be limited to one deck, and should only include introductions of the participants and illustrations of specific ideas discussed. Plan to leave 10 minutes for audience questions.

Session types  

 

New! workshop

Participants: 1 or 2 lead presenters (no co-presenters)

A 90-minute, highly enaging seminar, led by two topic experts with coaching or leadership skills. Workshops can vary between heavy brainstorming sessions, BYOD hands-on demos, or problem-solving challenges. Presenters are responsible for any printed materials needed to facilitate the workshop.  

 

LAB

Participants: 1 or 2 lead presenters + up to 3 co-presenters

A 2-hour hands-on learning experience on a very specific, technical topic. Attendees will learn how to do something with the help of 2 session leads and up to 3 co-presenters. Session leads should be the experts on the topic, with support of the co-presenters. Red Hat Summit lab audience size is limited to the number of seats (with hardware provided) available, and pre-registration is required. Slides are recommended for step-by-step instructions or to illustrate ideas.

Note: Lab speakers will need to work closely with event staff to identify technology requirements--internet connectivity, bandwidth, machine set-up, etc. The call for proposals (CFP) requires an estimation of minimum technology requirements.

Included in sessions  

 

In addition to specifying the session type, you'll also indicate whether your session includes the following elements. All are optional.

 

Roadmap

Roadmaps show the direction a product or technology is headed in the near future.

Demo

Demonstrations show hands-on use of a technology, and are usually performed live (though recorded backups are encouraged in case conference wi-fi is unreliable).

Customer or partner implementation

Including a success story helps attendees see how a concept might be applied in the real world, at a high level.

Participant types

 

Lead presenter

  • The lead presenter is the primary expert on the session's subject and will do most of the talking.
  • In a panel, the lead moderates a conversation among panelists, with whom they have  have discussed the session beforehand.
  • In a BoF, the lead moderates the discussion with the audience, and their main goal is to keep the conversation to the topic.

 

Co-presenter

  • Co-presenters support the lead presenter(s) and add their own unique experiences or ideas to the session.
  • In a panel, co-presenters are customers, partners, project participants, or the like, each with a unique voice on the topic.

 

Session assistant

An assistant is not a presenter, but has access to session and/or speaker details. This may be an administrative assistant, event manager, or Red Hat liaison that uploads files, updates abstracts, etc.

proposal tips

 

What makes your presentation special?

Do you have an exciting implementation story, a live demo, live polling, or new ways to use a tool? Why should we choose your abstract over others on your topic? The best sessions keep the attendees engaged with multiple delivery methods, so think about what you can offer and build your session around that.

 

WHAT WILL THE ATTENDEE LEAVE WITH?

Start with 1-2 sentences about the state of the market, IT trends, or recent announcements that make your topic not only relevant, but necessary to learn about. Then write as if you're describing your session to someone who's already sitting in your audience. List 3-4 takeaways, for example:

  • You will learn: 
  • In this session, we will discuss:
  • After this session, you will understand:

 

KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE...

...and make sure they know what to expect. If your abstract promises a high-level customer story, but you spend 30 minutes knee-deep in code, your audience will be frustrated, and the audience you should have had will be in another room. 

proposal tips

 

Keep it concise

  • Ideal title length: ≤60 characters.
    • How to write an attention-grabbing session title for Summit [59 char]: They don't always have to have a long, detailed subtitle to get your point across.
  • Ideal abstract length:  100-150 words. (This whole page has 133 words.)

 

Don't worry about polish. We'll help.

If your proposal is accepted, our editors will help you get the abstract into shape before it's published. This means editing for length, basic grammar and punctuation, and style.

 

Know what to expect when you submit.

  • The submission proposal form will ask for details about your session. This information helps attendees find the sessions that most appeal to them based on topics, technologies, or products.
  • The next few pages will give more information on specific fields on the submission form.

 

How to write a great bio

 

Start with the basics

Introduce yourself with basics like your company, job title, and current or recent projects. If you're just starting out, add your education, too. And keep it timely; a second-place award last year is more impressive than first-place in 1997.

Convince us

Why are you the best person to give this session? Is it a recent accolade? 20 years of research? Tell us why we should trust you on this topic.

Her point of view impressed us all

Good words always sound better coming from someone else, so write your bio in third person. E.g. "Samira's robotics team won the state championship in 2016." 

Limit the personal touches

A reader's attention is fleeting, so don't fill valuable space with info about your dogs or dance certifications (unless those details contribute to your subject matter expertise, in which case please invite me to your session).

Limit the whole thing, actually

Try to limit your bio to 75 words or fewer. That's about 5-6 sentences.

WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR

Red Hat Summit attendees have a lot on their minds. We've compiled topics we’re talking to our customers, partners, and colleagues with the most lately. Do you have great ideas about one of them? If so, you might have a session that’s perfect for Red Hat Summit.

Of course, we’re always looking for things like roadmaps, product demonstrations, intros and deep dives, customer and partner stories, and just plain cool technology.

And if your area of expertise isn’t on this list, don’t worry! We love to be surprised by submissions we didn’t know we needed.

 

EXISTING IT: HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF WHAT YOU HAVE

CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE: ADDING AND MANAGING IT EFFICIENTLY

BUILDING MORE MODERN APPLICATIONS

INTEGRATING EVERYTHING: APPS, DATA, AND PROCESSES

CULTURE, COMMUNITY, AND COLLABORATION

WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR

EXISTING I.T.: HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF WHAT YOU HAVE

Many organizations have invested resources in infrastructure and applications. What happens when they come under pressure to move to new technologies? Many of our attendees are wondering:

  • Why they should standardize operating platforms.

  • How to better handle requests from LoBs for access, data, and information.

  • Why an organization would pay for a subscription for free and open source software.

  • How to convince their managers of the need for XYZ technology.

  • How to go about replacing expensive infrastructure and applications.

  • Whether to modernize virtualization or build a private cloud.

  • How to consolidate systems, strategies, or SaaS apps after a merger or acquisition.

  • How to improve existing applications.

  • What it means to upgrade to software-defined storage.

  • What to do next, after Linux is a solved problem they don’t worry about any more.

WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR

CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE: ADDING AND MANAGING IT EFFICIENTLY

Compute, storage, and networking resources should be available on demand from a shared pool of physical systems--but how do we reach this ideal state? Think about how to explain:

  • How to develop a cloud strategy.

  • The complexity of OpenStack and how to overcome it

  • How to unify data in a hybrid world.

  • How to--or if they should--build a private cloud.

  • When a public cloud is appropriate.

  • How to deploy containers on cloud.

  • If containers are necessary, and how they’re different from virtual machines.

  • Where the Internet of Things fits in a cloud architecture.

  • The difference between community projects and enterprise products.

WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR

BUILDING MORE MODERN APPLICATIONS

Apps need to be created, maintained, and deployed quickly across hybrid cloud environments. How can you explain the following topics to attendees who want to get the most from innovative technologies and practices?

  • How (and why) to build cloud-native applications.

  • How process-driven applications create consistency.

  • Which workloads to move to container platforms.

  • Developing mobile-centric applications.

  • How to use or think about containers and microservices.

  • How to implement mobile apps better, faster, and easier.

  • Getting more value from the data they’re collecting.

  • How to accelerate app delivery with DevOps.

  • When microservices are appropriate--and when they’re not.

  • The balance of security and compliance with faster app development.

  • Where to start with old code and legacy services, without rewriting or breaking everything.

WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR

INTEGRATING EVERYTHING: APPS, DATA, AND PROCESSES

Make everything work together seamlessly. Sounds simple enough, right? Here are some of the things people are asking about integration:

  • How to deliver an omnichannel experience

  • How to integrate cloud-native applications

  • Connecting and collaborating with APIs and microservices

  • How to manage, implement, or build projects using APIs

  • How to integrate Software-as-a-Service across environments

WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR

CULTURE, COMMUNITY, AND COLLABORATION

People are at the center of everything we do, and there's always room for improvement. Some of the hot topics include:

  • Diversity and inclusion initiatives--how they're improving how we all work

  • Building and managing open source communities

  • How to use social media and communications tools for better collaboration

  • How to make Agile practices work for your team

  • Ways that open source is improving the world around us

  • How to encourage collaboration and innovation in others

  • How to achieve a work/life balance in tech

  • Personal goals and growth in the workplace

  • Open frameworks and process management

Session details

PRIMARY products and services

Choose up to 3 from a list of Red Hat products and professional services.

Topics

Identify up to 3 discussed in your session.

  • API management
  • App, process, & data integration
  • Application delivery
  • Application development
  • Application platforms
  • Business automation
  • Containers
  • Data & analytics
  • Diversity & inclusion
  • Emerging technologies
  • Hybrid cloud infrastructure
  • Infrastructure
  • IT automation
  • Management
  • Mobility
  • Open source community
  • Project & process management
  • Security
  • Software-definedtorage

Primary solution

What technology features most prominently in your session?

  • Cloud computing
  • Middleware
  • Storage
  • Linux platforms
  • Mobile
  • Virtualization
  • Other

 

session details

adding presenters

Here's what you'll need to know about all presenters you add to the session:

  • Name
  • Email
  • Company
  • Build applications
  • Manage and analyze data
  • Manage infrastructure
  • Design application/system architectures
  • Make final decisions about IT purchases/vendors
  • Manage people
  • Manage projects
  • Serve in an executive (VP or higher) role

industry

Only select this option if your session caters to a specific industry's interests (e.g. NFV for Telco).

  • Healthcare & life sciences
  • Telecommunications
  • Energy/Oil & Gas
  • Public Sector/Government
  • Financial services
  • Transportation
  • Education

 

  • Job title
  • Bio
  • Region & country
  • Contribute to community projects
  • Provide technical support
  • Sell technology or services
  • Market technology or services
  • Have another enterprise technology role
  • Contribute in a non-technical way

Audience

This session would be best for people who:

technical difficulty

 

Slide examples from last year

CFP WALKTHROUGH

 

WHAT to expect when you're submitting

NEW! The content system we're using this year is new for 2018. We recommend looking through this walkthrough prior to starting the submission process.

 

The rest of this guide will walk you through account registration and submission in the call for proposals (CFP) process:

  1. Creating an account
  2. Start a submission
  3. Adding presenters
  4. Saving and submitting

 

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 1: Register a new account

Tips

  • Start at redhat.com/summit.
  • Red Hat employees, use your official Red Hat email address to avoid account duplication.
  • Speaker accounts do not roll over from previous years; even if you presented or submitted last year, create a new account.

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 2: Start a submission

Tips

  • You may submit as many proposals as you like.
  • Review the descriptions and presenter details for each session type before submitting.

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 3: Tell us about your session

Tips​

  • See pages 14-16 of this guide for help with the requested tags.
  • If your session fits multiple topics, solutions, or audiences, choose the one(s) most relevant. 

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 4: Add participants

Tips​

  • The person submitting is not a presenter by default. If you're the only presenter, you must add your own details.
  • When entering Red Hat employees, use their "official" email address (ask if you don't know it).
  • You can only add as many presenters as the page allows (varies by session type).

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 5: Save as draft (just in case)

Tips​

  • Drafts are NOT considered as submissions You must complete a submission before we can consider it for Red Hat Summit.
  • To submit a draft, click Edit from your logged-in front page.

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 6: Review and submit

Tips​

  • A confirmation email will be sent automatically to only the submitter's address.
  • You cannot change a proposal once submitted. If you need to cancel a submission, email us.

CFP WALKTHROUGH

Step 7: Check status (and/or submit again)

Tips​

  • Check the home page to see your previous submissions.
  • Submission statuses:
    • Submitted: You're all done. We'll let you know in February.
    • Draft: You haven't given us all the details. We don't receive incomplete submissions.

CFP walkthrough

Step 8: Look forward to February

 

What to do now: 

  • You'll hear whether we've accepted or declined your proposal in February. 
  • Any questions about the proposal process? Email presenters@redhat.com.

 

Thanks, and good luck!

 

2018 Red Hat Summit submission guide

By events

2018 Red Hat Summit submission guide

  • 1,052

More from events